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Chitwan National Park

A brief history:

The Chitwan region has had a long history of conservation. For many years it was the royal hunting grounds for the kings and dignitaries of Népal and therefore was not hunted by the general public.

It did however become a favorite spot for big game safari hunters in the late nineteenth and early mid-twentieth centuries.

This was coupled with a surge in local human populations following the development of anti-malaria medicines in the mid-twentieth century.

The long term effect was a drastic decrease in jungle habitat and animal populations in the Chitwan valley as jungles were converted to farmland and big game were hunted and poached to dangerously low numbers.

But thanks to conservation and preservation efforts, an area of 967q km was established in 1973 as Chitwan National Park, the first of its kind in Nepal (‘Chitwan’ means « in the heart of the jungle »).

The park itself:

At the foot of the Himalayas, Chitwan is one of the most undisturbed vestiges of the Terai region, which formerly extended over the foothills of India and Nepal.

It has a particularly rich flora and fauna and is considered by naturalists as one of the finest and most famous park in South Asia.

The diversity of its fauna is just amazing with more than 500 one-horned rhinoceros, majestic Royal Bengal tigers, countless leopards, sloth bears, gaurs (indian bisons), four species of deer, two species of monkeys, wild boars, jackals, civets, wild cats, wild elephants (season-wise) and many other kinds of mammals.

Reptiles are also found in big numbers such as huge varieties of snakes including the famous Indian Cobra, Pythons and two kinds of crocodiles (marshmagar and gharial) that you will see slither through the river during your canoe trip.

Chitwan National Park is a dreamland for bird watchers with more than 450 different kinds of birds.

A unique breathtaking adventure is awaiting you, thanks to our very experienced jungle guides.